July 22, 2014

‘Fewer cases of sexual abuse of boys reported’

Between the Lines - An Analysis of Media Report on Child Sexual Abuse

Since the year 2006, Arpan has carefully recorded and documented incidents of Child Sexual Abuse as reported in some of the leading newspapers of Mumbai. This study is an analysis of the trends and patterns found in such newspaper reports between the years of 2007 and 2011.



‘Fewer cases of sexual abuse of boys reported’
Times of India 21st July, 2014

MUMBAI: If the media is a mirror to society, how well does Mumbai's media reflect the prevalence of child sexual abuse in the world around us? An analysis of news reports from 2007 to 2011 shows that a very small proportion of boys facing abuse was reflected in mainstream media. An even lower figure of female abusers was reported. Much coverage on child sexual abuse focused on metropolitan cities. Non-contact forms of abuse, such as showing a child pornography or flashing, were under-represented in the media.

These are some findings of a recent report by NGO Arpan, which analyzed media reportage on child sex abuse.

While the analysis focused on media here, not surprisingly 51% of cases reported were from the city itself. However, of the remaining reports, an overwhelming majority was from other metropolitan cities, while only 4% was from the rest of Maharashtra. "This points to a trend where issues of cosmopolitan/metropolitan cities get greater prominence over occurrences in smaller cities, towns and villages," the report said.

In 10% cases, the report said that either the victim or perpetrator are in some way identified, such as the name of the school to which the child belongs and standard the child is studying in, as well as the victim's address. "Though the press is prohibited from reporting certain details, specifically names of child victims, offenders and witnesses or any other details that have the probability of revealing the victim's identity; this is not followed strictly in all cases. The restriction on publication of identifying details of child sex abuse victims exist to protect the victims' identity and as this may discourage other victims to come forward and report," the study said.

Of the reports, only 8% were of boys who were sexually abused. "This is because of fewer cases of sexual abuse of boys coming out in the open. This is not surprising as sexual abuse of boys is often underreported, under-recognized, and under-treated," the report said.

The study showed that most news reports are triggered by incidents and do not tackle the wider issues and why it occurs. The report called for more analysis within mainstream media on issues of prevention when it comes to child sex abuse.

July 2, 2014

The silent epidemic

Publication: The Age World 
Date: 19th June, 2014

The recent gang rape of two young female cousins in Uttar Pradesh has highlighted the shocking rates of sexual abuse and incest suffered by Indian children. Amrit Dhillon reports.

Sexual abuse and incest often go unreported in India. Photo: Getty Images

It took three questions to expose the ignorance, or denial, of Indians about child sexual abuse. InSatyamev Jayate (Truth Alone Prevails), the first television program to discuss the issue, the host, Bollywood star Aamir Khan, asked the audience: How widespread do you think it is? Where are children safest? Who are the perpetrators?
The studio audience at the 2012 program gave wrong answers to all three, estimating that around 2 per cent to 10 per cent of children might be sexually abused, saying children were safest in their homes, and that the abusers must be strangers.
The truth, as Khan pointed out before interviewing survivors, was that 53 per cent of all children in India have suffered some form of sexual abuse according to the latest available figures from a 2007 government survey. What was shocking was the survey showed that children are most at risk at home and the culprits are usually male relatives or trusted family friends. Indeed, it found that 31 per cent of sexual assaults were committed by the victim's uncle or male neighbour.
The gasps of incredulity from the audience on hearing these facts were followed by tears as they listened in horror to Khan asking twentysomething Cindrella Prakash to relate how a family friend had regularly assaulted her, starting when she was 12.
''My mother was having dialysis. Those were the days when he knew he would find me alone. I was scared to tell my parents because I thought they might stay at home to protect me instead of going to the hospital for dialysis and my mother would die,'' she told Khan.
His next guest was Harish Iyer, 35, who was sexually abused from the age of 7 to 18 by a close male relative who sodomised him. He invited his friends to abuse Iyer too.
''I distrusted all men. I used to hate standing with my back to people in school in case there was blood on my shorts,'' said Iyer. When he was 12, Iyer plucked up the courage to tell his mother that he was bleeding from his anus. Though loving and close to him, she brushed it aside. ''It's the mangoes you've been eating, they can cause heat in your body,'' she said.
The 2007 survey showed that 53 per cent of the of 12,500 children interviewed had been sexually abused in ways that ranged from severe - rape or fondling - to milder forms such as forcible kissing.
Shockingly, despite widespread media coverage when the survey was released, public reaction to the results faded quickly, and the response from authorities was almost non-existent. According to many who work in the field of child abuse in India, most Indians continued to think that they love and indulge their children, that most families are happy, and that such perversions as child sex abuse, including incest, belong to the sex-obsessed West.
In devoting an episode of his series to incest, Khan broke new ground. His intention was to shatter both the delusion that it doesn't affect Indian families and the code of silence around the terrible problem.
''India has 470 million children. If 53 per cent of the 12,500 children interviewed were sexually abused, then this is the greatest silent epidemic in the country,'' says Suchismita Bose, director of The Foundation, a Mumbai NGO.
Child sex abuse is not peculiar to India. As in other countries, in India it is found in every social class and while it also affects boys, it is primarily girls who are the victims.
Yet, the figures available for India are appallingly high. Anuja Gupta, director of RAHI (Recovering and Healing from Incest), a Delhi support centre for victims, says that while the 2007 survey may not be as rigorous as some studies, it revealed that the problem of incest was widespread.
''From the 2007 figures, I'm not sure you can say that one in two Indian children suffers sexual abuse. One in two of the children in the sample were abused. Unlike in the West where rigorous and conclusive data collected over a long period is available, we don't have that. But yes, in my 18 years' experience, I have met very few women who have not been abused in some way,'' says Gupta,
Experts believe that in India, certain cultural and social factors might play a part in making abuse easier and speaking out about it harder.
These factors include a taboo on talking about sex and sexuality; entrenched patriarchy and misogyny in large parts of society which serve to make women powerless and vulnerable; the belief inculcated in children that elders are right and must be obeyed; and stigmatisation of the victim and family by their entire social circle.
Khan's TV program opened the floodgates. At the government-funded Childline India Foundation, which runs a 24-hour helpline in Delhi and other cities, Heenu Singh, head of the northern region, saw a spike in the number of calls after the program was aired. ''Children realised they were not alone, that others too had been abused,'' she says.
Singh remembers a case from that time which exemplifies the complex factors that come into play if children are able to tell an adult that they are being abused. The young woman who called the helpline said her father had been having intercourse with her for five years.
Finally, she told her mother. The mother protected her two younger daughters by sending them to live with her parents. But she left the eldest at home. ''She told her daughter to tolerate it, until she got married and could leave,'' says Singh.
The situation became more distressing after the young woman decided, after much agonising, to report her father to the police.
''The father was arrested and the victim taken to a residential home. Her mother is struggling to support her two other daughters. Both sides of the family have abandoned them. No one will want to marry these three sisters. That's why children take so long to speak out. The consequences are so catastrophic for everyone,'' says Singh.
The cultural inhibition against talking about sex and sexuality is something that everyone working with survivors singles out as being particularly harmful. Indians are uncomfortable talking about sexuality. Sex education in schools is frowned on, with opponents calling it ''indecent''. Menstruation is a forbidden topic.
''We need open conversations about sex so that children understand what is normal sexual contact and what is abnormal, but we can't do that while sex is shrouded in shame and mysticism,'' says Vidya Reddy, director of Tulir, one of the country's largest groups working to prevent abuse and to counsel victims.
''Some girls don't even realise they are being sexually exploited because they have no knowledge or experience. More conversations would also enable parents to detect abuse by being more aware,'' says Reddy.
Pooja Taparia, a graphic designer by profession, set up the organisation Arpan in Mumbai in 2006 after watching a play on child sex abuse and discovering that only two NGOs were working in this field.
Arpan has worked with 66,000 children. Taparia says the reluctance to talk about sex and private body parts has not changed. The standard cry of family members, when young children inadvertently touch or expose their genitals, is ''shame, shame!''
When this inhibition about talking about sex is added to the shame and guilt that victims already feel, it is a miracle that any child in India ever speaks out.
''Very early on, children realise that sexuality is stigmatised. If body parts are treated as something dirty, an abused child is going to be unwilling to raise the topic. No one even uses the right vocabulary for body parts, preferring euphemisms like 'man point' or 'pee pee' for penis,'' says Taparia.
Despite the advances made by educated and affluent women, the vast majority of Indian women are subservient. They are not the decision-makers or breadwinners and must defer to the men in their lives.
Consequently, if a mother discovers that her husband, cousin, male relative or family friend is abusing her child, she is often not confident enough to speak out. Doing so can leave her and her children destitute.
''One of my cases was an orphan living with her grandparents,'' says Taparia.
''Her grandfather had sex with her for years and later invited his neighbour to rape her too. The grandmother knew but kept quiet, fearing the financial cataclysm if the breadwinner was put behind bars.''
Alongside lack of economic independence, the fear of destroying the family name holds many women back. Girls and women are taught that they must protect the family name no matter what. In Indian society, people are not individuals but part of a collective unit and any ''shame'' that attaches to one person stains the entire family.
Gupta says the very size of the extended Indian family also provides more opportunities for abuse to happen. The extended family in India can include a father's fifth cousin; he is not regarded as a distant relative but very much an integral part of the family.
''Family is paramount. Life revolves around relatives. Holidays are spent with relatives. So, with male cousins, grandfathers and their brothers, brothers in law, and uncles, there are more opportunities for potential abusers, particularly as all relatives are regarded as close,'' Gupta says.
Some of the worst abuse happens in residential care facilities where inspections are infrequent. Some facilities are not even registered. On May 29, The Times of India reported the arrest of Ajit Dabholkar, who ran an illegal shelter just 60 kilometres from Mumbai.
The children at the shelter, some as young as 11, reported being forced to have sex with Dabholkar and with one another. The abuse came to light when one girl visited her home in early May. She told the police that if they resisted, they were forced to eat dog excreta and locked up.
Perhaps the most powerful deterrent in speaking out about abuse is the cruelty of Indian society. Victims know that they and their loved ones will be shunned like diseased street dogs.
The parents of a 16-year-old girl in Kerala experienced this from the day their ordeal began. In 1996, their daughter was raped for 40 days by 42 men who drove her from place to place. The case involved top politicians and dragged on for years. Last year, 35 of the accused were finally convicted.
But in all those years, it was not the accused but the girl and her parents who were ostracised. Every few months, when their identity became known, they were forced to move out by hissing, disdainful neighbours.
Very gradually, the culture of silence is being broken. In April, actress Kalki Koechlin said publicly that she had been abused as a child. As it happens, Koechlin has recently separated from her husband, film director Anurag Kashyap, who also revealed that he was abused for 11 years.
Last year, Anoushka Shankar, musician and daughter of the legendary Indian sitar player Ravi Shankar, admitted she had been subjected to groping as a little girl by a man her parents trusted. Such admissions were unthinkable till very recently, and suggest there is some progress in breaking down the taboo around sexual abuse and incest.
In recent years, many NGOs have been set up to help victims by , for example, conducting workshops in schools and raising public awareness. Many have also lobbied the government for better policies.
This lobbying, added to the slight increase in society's willingness to talk about the issue, has led to the formation of a new law dealing specifically with child sex abuse. The 2012 Protection of Children from Sexual Offences law provides protection to all children under the age of 18 from sexual abuse.
The new law is different from those that already existed to deal with sexual abuse in that it deals specifically with children. Penalties range from three to 10-year jail sentences.
Singh says high-profile cases such as the 2012 Delhi gang rape, in which a young woman was raped so savagely that she died of her injuries, have also added to the push towards breaking the silence around incest.
''After the Delhi gang rape, rape is now openly discussed. I hope child sex abuse will be given similar treatment. Only when the silence is broken can we start confronting the conditions that allow it to happen.'' .
Amrit Dhillon is a journalist based in Delhi.

June 4, 2014

Talk on the Child Side


MidDay By Maleeva RebelloPosted 09-Apr-2014

A mammoth conference of different NGOs is to held in the city mid-month, bringing together all those who work in the field of Child Sexual Abuse (CSA), on new ways to confront and combat a growing but still under-reported malaise.

A first of its kind, Annual Stakeholder's Conference on Child Sexual Abuse (CSA) is set to be held in Mumbai in the coming week. Actor Rahul Bose's NGO - The Foundation that works with victims of child sexual abuse announced this two day conference at a press conference.

The Bollywood actor at a press conference at Mahalaxmi said, "CSA is considered taboo in India. At this conference scheduled for April 16 and 17, 20 NGOs in the country that deal with child sexual abuse will unite. Coming together to discuss and learn what each of them are doing will help the awareness and prevention of this heinous crime."


Together for a cause: (L-R) Rahul Bose, Suchismita Bose, Kalki Koechlin and Rahul Akerkar. Pic/Shadab Khan

In India, government statistics say that 53 per cent of children in India have faced or face sexual abuse. Bollywood actor, Kalki Koechlin who lent her support to the cause said, "Sexual abuse is something that has been brushed under the carpet for a very long time in India. The 2012 passing of the Protection of Children from Sexual Offences Act (POSCO) (See box) is a step forward."

Talking about how The Foundation works with child sexual abuse awareness in schools, Suchismita Bose, director of the NGO said, "We work with awareness, therapy and advocacy. We also conduct workshops for children, parents and teachers. So far we have been able to speak to 53 schools in the city."


Reel Life: A scene from the movie Monsoon Wedding. The film touched upon the problem of Child Sexual Abuse (CSA)

Shedding light on why he chose to throw his weight behind the cause of CSA, Rahul Bose said, "I've had five relationships and the truth is that four of my girlfriends have been victims of child sexual abuse. I was fortunate to not have had any such incident in my life, but I've met many people who have sadly had to live with the scar. Many of these women always felt it was their fault and they were greatly depressed that their family members, especially their mothers did not believe them when they spoke about the abuse."

For Koechlin, the education system and the way it deals with education about body parts and sexuality is to blame for lack of awareness. She said, "In school, I remember learning about the sexual parts of the body in a class where we all giggled. There is a need for social sex education. Complex topics about sexuality and sex need to be discussed."



Wary: The Anchorage Child Sexual Abuse case garnered huge media attention and created some awareness

When Koechlin was quizzed by the media about being sexually abused as a child she said, "The reason you haven't heard about it is that I don't like to talk about it. For me, it's not a one day headline; it's something that's a reality I have lived with for a long time. Many of us have gone through it and most of the people that I know, especially close friends of mine who are women, have gone through some form of CSA. It's just so out there, so much of it that I think it's not something that should be ignored."
The conference on CSA which is set to be held in the city at the National Centre for the Performing Arts (NCPA) later this month will see the lawyer Flavia Agnes, gynaecologist Dr Duru Shah and child psychologist Dr Amit Sen among others come together to speak about their understanding of the problem.

The trio were part of the core group working on CSA, who had come together to help draft the POSCO Act. Now two years later, and the Act is up for review, they hope to make some more suggestions.


Animated: A still from Komal, a film on CSA by Childline

Suchismita Bose adds, "It took about five years for the bill to come about. I had a great experience working with these people and so it was easy to get them all together for this review. Everyone is gung-ho about sharing their experiences. There is hardly any research when it comes to CSA. Hopefully, after this conference, our findings will help get some fresh statistics."

With the new government set to be formed along the same time as the findings of the conference being chartered, the NGOs working towards tackling CSA are very hopeful.

Rahul said, "We had planned the conference much before the election dates were known. But it is a good thing that they both will be happening around the same time."

Stating that CSA doesn't have the platform that AIDS, cancer and polio have when it comes to awareness and visibility in the form of campaigns, NGOs associated with the cause, are hopeful the conference will help maximise collective strengths, minimise weaknesses and plug-in the gaps.

Suchismita Bose, who is also one of the speakers at the conference, ends, "With a lot of media awareness and the government taking huge steps to help CSA victims, the ground level is much better. The current Act has some loopholes, which need to be ironed out which, through this conference we will hope to do."

Reaching Out
Sudeesh TM from Childline which is India's only helpline for children said, "We worked closely in getting the POSCO bill passed and helped close the gaps when it came to the problems the victim's faced. Like in the Anchorage case, which is a big case law, the ground reality is that even today, many children are being sexually assaulted by foreigners in India. Since 2011, we have been working with awareness and safety rules for children in schools across Mumbai."
With films like Bunty aur Pinky and Komal, an animated film that educates children on body parts as well as child sexual abuse, Sudeesh says, "We are reaching out to kids suffering from various kinds of exploitation throughout the country. Child sexual abuse is a part of daily life for many street children as well as children from affluent families and we do our best to help the children deal with the case."

On the child sexual abuse conference, Pooja Taparia, Founder and Chief Executive of Arpan, an NGO that deals with child sexual abuse said, "We are really excited about meeting other people who deal with child sexual abuse. The work we do is connected to personal safety where we go to schools and teach children, teachers and parents. We will be presenting our work at this conference and it is a great opportunity to learn and share our experiences."

Talking about April as the month of child sexual abuse, Taparia added, "Every day is child sexual abuse day for us as we meet and counsel victims as well as spread awareness on the issue. We are contributing to the child sexual abuse blog that has been created especially to observe this month."

Majlis which will also be presenting their work at the conference later this month deals with the legal aspect of child sexual abuse. Audrey D'mello, Programme Director at Majlis said, "We run victim support programmes and work with the state on the socio-legal front. The conference on child sexual abuse will be a great chance to see the work that is being done in other parts of India. Here in Mumbai, the identification parade, questions asked by the defence, etc are very uncomfortable and cause questions to be raised on the dignity of victims, this is where we step in. When it comes to child sexual abuse, it has to be a question and answer format that we ensure is followed as part of protocol."

A police awareness programme that they conducted recently helped the police force better understand child sexual abuse. D'mello said, "From September 2013 to February 2014, we have had an awareness programme for 670 policemen in Mumbai. Very often, the police fail to understand the nitty gritty of POSCO and so this awareness was a start. On the field, if any child sexual abuse case is dealt with in an insensitive manner, we can now contact the higher ups and ensure that the child gets respect. The legal system is very scary and family support is missing for many victims of child sexual abuse, we try to help them deal with the problem as well as look for effective legal solutions."

February 4, 2014

UNSAFE TOUCHES


Arpan, an NGO in Mumbai, has been tirelessly working on the issue of Child Sexual Abuse since 2006. Arpan empowers children, teachers, parents, NGO professionals and other care givers in multiple settings like schools, NGO set ups, institutions etc. with knowledge, skills and attitude to prevent instances of child sexual abuse. Arpan also offers psychotherapeutic/counseling support through trained, qualified therapists to children and adult survivors of sexual abuse and their families. Arpan has so far impacted the lives of over 250,000 children and adults, directly and indirectly.

Childhood is a happy time. A time spent with friends, playing, singing and being carefree. It’s also a time when children are most vulnerable to sexual abuse or an unsafe touch by a person who is more powerful than the child. This powerful person can be anyone who is an adult or an older person. While children at times, may be too small to realize this, its impact often stays with them for the rest of their lives. Arpan’s newest installation "Unsafe Touches" showcased at the Kalaghoda Festival (Mumbai) from 1st to 9th February, 2014 aims to educate parents and other family members of this quiet threat in a unique manner.

The installation – large cut-outs of children playing ring-a-ring-a-roses in bubble wrap is symbolic of the fragile and innocent childhood that needs protecting. When a person touches the bubble wrap it bursts, thus highlighting how easy it is for a child’s life to be shadowed and inundated.


  


For more information:
Call - 98190 51444 / 2686 2444 / 2686 8444
Counselling Support - 98190 86444 / support@arpan.org.in



Concept & Copy: Pankaj Garde and Rinku Jariwala

Designer: Pankaj Garde, Prashant Pradhan & Rinku Jariwala, The Open Sky Art team – Jayendra Mohare, Sandip Gotal, Sagar Bhosale, Pravin Dankar, Sunil Bhalerao, Mayur Zunjaker, Shekhar Kinjale, Vikram Gawari, Mayur Nikam and Dr. Prachin Jariwala.

January 3, 2014

5 day intensive Workshop on “Play & Sand Therapy” from 13th to 17th Jan, 2014

Dear All,

Greetings from Arpan! 

ARPAN is happy to announce yet another 5 day intensive Workshop on “Play & Sand Therapy” with specialized skills in using Sand Therapy.

What is Play Therapy?
Play Therapy is a form of counselling or psychotherapy that uses play to communicate with and help people, especially children, to prevent or resolve psychosocial challenges. This is thought to help them towards better social integration, growth and development. This workshop will provide us an introduction to play therapy and various tools that can be used while working with children and adults.

What is Sand Therapy?
This workshop will also provide an Introduction to the Sand tray (which is a generic term describing how boxes of sand are used with small toys as part of a play therapy program) to work with children and adolescents. Sandplays are created in a free and protected space, where the therapist does not interpret, interfere with, or direct the client's symbolic expression. The sandplay therapist maintains an attitude of receptivity and acceptance, so the client can bring unconscious material into consciousness without censure.


The workshop will be conducted by extremely experienced trainers from 'Parivarthan'. The 5 days intensive workshop will be held from 13th January 2014 to 17th January 2014 at Vinalaya, Behind Holy Family Church, Next to Gurunanak School, Chakala, Mahakali Caves Road, Andheri - East, Mumbai.
The fees for the workshop is Rs. 10000/- per person {inclusive of 2 teas/coffee, breakfast & lunch}

For any queries, please contact:
Chandrika Rambiya - Senior Counselor, Healing Unit
Email: chandrika@arpan.org.in or crambiya@gmail.com
Mobile: 9819385058

December 7, 2013

Why Counselling Is Important?

Arpan provides therapeutic services to Adult Survivors of childhood sexual abuse with an aim to heal the psychological, social, sexual and physical consequences of CSA. These services are offered within the Arpan centres and at the community level with support of NGO’s and social service organizations. Our counsellors/ therapists help the clients to work on their triggers and other symptoms of CSA, you may contact us on the counselling help line number- 9819086444

It's true that some older survivors of child sexual abuse can have experiences that trigger a powerful resurgence of past trauma. This articles helps to understand the long term impact of child sexual abuse, what can trigger it and ways to seek support for survivors who are experiencing a hard time with their pasts.

http://www.pannone.com/solicitors-for-you/abuse-claims/child-abuse-claims/child-abuse-triggers

December 3, 2013

Support ARPAN in the awareness campaign about Child Sexual Abuse by Gudville.com

Arpan has participated in awareness and fundraising campaign created by Gudville.com. 

To support please click on the link below and the page opens, and then click “I Support” button. 

https://www.gudville.com/app?a=pt_tk_actn_v11&oi=mcYBwDWDmS%2FX9SPbqXs57s6zP2JmJXPT&ei=%2FRzX67Ry91dJyfoBDLWf3hJ3v8QotTwd&ra=opty_sh_lg

*They may ask you to login from either your Facebook or Linkedin account to confirm your pledge towards the cause.




Let us work towards spreading maximum awareness on the cause of Child Sexual Abuse. Help Arpan spread the word.

Thank You.

November 29, 2013

Every Child Is Innocent Save Them from Fear. STOP CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE


Child Sexual Abuse leaves a wound that does not heal with time but could get worse. Individuals could either grow up to be disturbed and traumatized adults or at times become abusers themselves. The impact of childhood sexual abuse stays with the person for a long time, much beyond the immediate trauma. It continues to affect them even as they continue to become adults at various levels; emotional, social, sexual and psychological.

According to WHO, India has the world’s largest number of sexually abused children, with a child below 16 years raped every 155th minute, a child below 10 every 13th hour, and one in every 10 children sexually abused at any point of time. Given the high prevalence of Child Sexual Abuse (CSA) and its long lasting negative impact on the life of the individual it becomes imperative that interventions are taken.



Most children quietly suffer, and don’t talk about Sexual Abuse, But we need to talk about it, so that WE can PREVENT IT and HEAL it’s ill effects.

November 22, 2013

Arpan Working towards the Freedom from Child Sexual Abuse


The motivation to initiate work on Child sexual abuse (CSA) within Arpan actually started in 2004 when Pooja Taparia, the Founder and CEO, was inspired by the play 30 Days in September, which depicts the trauma faced by a survivor of sexual abuse as they carry on with life, in their decisions, their relationships, their aspirations, their fears, their choices, every day.



In 2006 Arpan started its work on CSA with the Prevention and Healing services.
With one counselor, Arpan began conducting talks to spread awareness on the issue of Child Sexual Abuse. Arpan reached out to housing societies, civil society clubs like Rotary & Lions Clubs, interested colleges or any other forum or platform, where they could reach out to a parent or adult & talk to them about the cause. Arpan also took on cases to enable adult survivors to come to terms with their trauma as well, and move on to lead more fulfilling lives.
Arpan has so far reached out to over 50,000 parents, teachers, children, adolescents, young adults, NGO professionals, caretakers and mental health professionals directly and over 2, 00,000 indirectly with our prevention and healing programs.

November 19, 2013

कोवळ्या वेलींना वेळीच द्या आधार!

"Child Sexual Abuse is any act using a child for the sexual gratification of the more powerful person" 
"Aware parents and caretakers can help a sexually abused child better"

These are some messages which Arpan talks about on Child Sexual Abuse through their various programs, Sakal has very kindly published the information in their newspaper today.


19th November - World Day for Prevention of Child Abuse


"Child Sexual Abuse is a violation of a child's body as well as of the trust, implicit in a care giving relationship. This violation can have a significant impact on how the child, as a victim and later as an adult survivor, see and experiences the world. The effects of child sexual abuse can be damaging but need not be permanent."

19th November - World Day for Prevention of Child Abuse

www.arpan.org.in

November 18, 2013

VOTE for ARPAN and help us reach out to maximum children for Personal Safety Education Program


HelpYourNGO.com has started an fundraising contest for NGO's working with children and Arpan has been shortlisted for it. Arpan with the other NGO's will be competing for the donation which would be only given if we receive the highest number of votes.

VOTE for Arpan and help us reach out to more number for children through our Personal Safety Education Program with the help of the donation. 

Just click on the link and select Arpan (Preventing Child Sexual Abuse) and submit your vote.

http://www.helpyourngo.com/ngo_vote.php

November 15, 2013

“Is it my fault??”


This happened in one of the city schools where Arpan’s Personal Safety Education Project was being implemented. It was the last session for that grade and the trainer was teaching them about the last and one of the most critical rule ‘It is not your fault if somebody has broken Personal Safety Rule 1’. It was then that one child approached the trainer in an overwhelming state. The child shared that she was being sexually abused repeatedly and in spite of knowing the abuser’s intention of calling her alone she was not being able to stop the abuse and hence deduced it to be her fault. In order to stop the ongoing abuse and help the child overcome the deep rooted belief and taking onus of the abuse, Arpan’s Psycho-Social team and the Psychotherapeutic team worked together along with the PSE team. The psychosocial team made home visits to understand the family dynamics and brought the sexual abuse to their attention. The family could identify the offender, the behaviours that he was showing namely isolating the child and giving expensive gifts (which they earlier thought to be driven by love and affection). Being empowered the family could stand up for their child and keep the abuser out of their home. The Psychotherapeutic team simultaneously supported the child’s healing by working on her self-esteem, shame and guilt around the abuse.

Personal Safety Education Project is one of the core interventions of Arpan that focuses on empowering children with adequate knowledge, attitude and skills to prevent instances of child sexual abuse as well as to seek support when such an incident has occurs. Arpan conducts this module with children in privately owned and government schools as well as with highly vulnerable groups of children referred by NGOs, and in shelter homes and orphanages. The PSE project also involves awareness building and skill enhancement of adults (like parents, teachers and institutional caretakers) who are the primary stakeholders and caregivers in a child’s life in order to create strong safety and support networks around children in their respective environments.

November 2, 2013

“I’m the Boss of my body”, the children say with conviction in their voices...


In the last six months i.e from April to September 2013 Arpan taught over 5200 children personal safety program, helped 200 children heal through counselling, created awareness on CSA amongst 6500 parents and teachers, trained 750 police cadets, constables and inspectors, trained 200 mental health, social service professionals and teachers to address CSA in their environments. We also reached out to over 250 varied professionals through our public and policy advocacy initiatives. Overall we reached out to over 13,000 individuals in six months.


Arpan empowers children, teachers, parents, NGO professionals and other care givers in multiple setting like schools, NGO set ups, institutions etc. with knowledge, skills and attitude to prevent instances of child sexual abuse and provide adequate support to children who have been victims. Along with empowering relevant stakeholders, Arpan also offers psychotherapeutic support through trained, qualified therapists to children and adult survivors of sexual abuse and their families. 

www.arpan.org.in